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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 18 2014 :  10:11:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The link I posted was just for their seed line. If you go to the web site you need to open the product list for the feed.
My cows are pretty much all hay. I mix alfalfa with native grasses. Buffalo grass and so on. Treat time is flax pellets with corn and oats mixed with Fertrell Dairy Nutribalancer #1 ( organic ok mineral mix ) and kelp meal. we always have a Redmond mineral salt lick out and free range DI ( diatomaceous earth ) and baking soda. From time to time they get a cow ball which is vitamin c mixed with organic molasses and grains made into a large ball. Here is the link to the main site.

http://www.buckwheatgrowers.com

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Nov 19 2014 :  05:14:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We fought thistles like crazy at our old house. I used to spray a product called Burnout on them which was mostly clove oil. It smelled really good and killed the thistle. Unfortunately like MaryJane said 10 more just came up in its place. It looks like Burnout has since been discontinued. I think I may have eventually won the battle that way, but I ran out of money to keep buying it 2 gallons at a time.

We have noticed a place in our pasture at this house where thistle is quite prevalent, so we are back to the battle. I pulled a bunch this summer when we were irrigating and the ground was really soft. Lots of roots came out, but this fall it looks to have done its spreading trick. It's the nodules on the root that make it break off that make it so annoying and hard to get rid of.
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maryjane

6883 Posts


Posted - Nov 19 2014 :  07:19:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If any thing was ever going to defeat me, it would be thistle.

MaryJane Butters, author of Milk Cow Kitchen ~ striving for the stoicism of a cow standing in the rain ~
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 19 2014 :  07:29:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Seemed like my Icelandic sheep loved it.they would run by and alfalfa bush and graze the thistle to the ground. We had a few areas of Russian and Canadian thistle here when I moved in and I have not seen it since! I better get some more sheep!

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Nov 19 2014 :  09:40:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ron you rent out your sheep and I'll rent out my goats...thistle be gone!! Or maybe this is the push I need to get sheep now! My family would just laugh...hard to believe this city girl has gone so country and loves every single minute of it. What did you do with your sheep, Ron? Meat? Wool?

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 19 2014 :  11:41:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My sheep were registered Icelandic, great animals. The line I was breeding was for fiber, breeding stock and milk of all things..lol..had up to thirty here. The wool was really sought after for hand spinners. The wool was natrually multi colored. If memory serves me the wool washed,picked and spun sold for $18.00 an ounce for organic wool. The meat last I remember sold for $8.50 a pound hanging weight. I never sold meat but some we sold sheep to did.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Nov 19 2014 :  7:10:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've always thought it would be fun to learn how to spin wool; however, that would take some time and I don't have much of that lately. I looked up where some breeders are located and one is listed in Viola, ID, which is just 8 miles away! They certainly are a beautiful breed with their wool.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 19 2014 :  7:53:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Majestic animals, parasite resistant, very hardy animals. Whatever you do don't go look at them! You will fall in love with them.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 19 2014 :  7:54:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oh by the way, spinning wool is not hard. 😊

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Nov 22 2014 :  5:13:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You are awesome, Ron! Is there anything you can't do? My sister has Icelandic sheep, also some Jacobs and a few crosses of both. She just got a ram of a different breed that is very small. (I need to pay more attention, sorry. I've kind of been consumed by cows lately.) Her goal is to breed for a specific length and quality of wool with the idea that she will spin it. I think they have 11 sheep now with plans to have lambs in the spring or summer. She's also thinking goats after the first of the year, Charlene. Nubian cross I think. They have them all picked out, but are busy barn building right now, so they'll wait to go get them.
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 22 2014 :  6:18:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lots I can't do Keeley. Right now struggling to learn to cook and bake..uuuugghhh would rather fix a mile of rusty fence and rotted posts than work in the kitchen..lol..

When things settle down some I am thinking a few Icelandic ash hep around here again. I sure miss the weed control and actually did well with lambs and wool. Seems the Icelandics were no trouble up here.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Nov 22 2014 :  10:09:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Keeley, tell your sister that Nubians are very noisy! In fact, this past spring we had a family purchase two of our kid goats that had just gotten rid of their Nubians because they were incredibly noisy. My Oberhasli herd really is not noisy...I can easily get them to talk to me if I go out on the porch and call them, but they certainly don't sit there and "maaa" at everything. If she wants goat milk that tastes really good, then I highly recommend the Oberhasli breed as well...it tastes the closest to cows milk out of all the goat breeds. I could go on and on about my Oberhaslis because I really do love them!

Ron, you are just a pest...putting spinning wool back into my head! lol Just what I need...another project. First, I need to learn to make cheese...but I suppose I could be learning while the sheep were helping with weed control?? See what I mean? The idea is stuck in my head now!! Yikes!

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 23 2014 :  05:21:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Charlene it is going to be nine months till you get milk from Clover. Think of all the wool you can spin between now and then. I will warn you, keeping the sheep clean will save you time and work later. Always bed on straw and never feed hay on the ground if you can help it. If the wool gets lodged with VM ( vegatables matter ) guess who has to pick it out of the washed wool.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 23 2014 :  05:23:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nothing cuter than a few woolly sheep bouncing around the place.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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farmlife

1413 Posts


Posted - Nov 23 2014 :  1:25:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Is that why people put jackets on the sheep, Ron? Is it just to keep the wool clean?
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 23 2014 :  1:59:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yep. Nothing worse than picking wool full of VM. Lots of work.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Nov 23 2014 :  2:37:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, I think we will wait until we have a barn and more fencing up. Ron, what sort of fencing did your sheep require? And, did you rotate their pasture? I really do think a spinning wheel in the corner of my family room would be rather cool. My husband likes to watch movies and I hate to sit with idle hands...I could spin wool! Usually I'm doing some sort of hand-work such as knitting, crocheting, or hardanger embroidery.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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NellieBelle

11033 Posts


Posted - Nov 23 2014 :  3:12:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I see wool gloves, socks, cardigans etc. in Charlene's future. You could probably get the kids to help with carding the wool. I've always thought it would be fun to card, spin, weave. I'm pretty sure I would be sent away if the idea was mentioned. But such beautiful things can be made. It would certainly be a memorable art/talent for the kids to learn as well.
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 23 2014 :  4:24:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Charlene. They have kelp in fifty pound sacks on the product list not the seed list. DI is diatomaceous earth, the have that as well.
My cow eats all hay year round with some fresh grass when it is growing. They always have a Redmond mineral salt block and free range baking soda and kelp out as well as DI. Also when I milk they get about two pounds of flax pellets and two pounds of oat corn mix with some of the Fertrell dairy Nutribalancer number one. Fertrell has minerals and many other animal and other products for organic producers.
To date we have not had health or parasite issues with the cows or the SHEEP. Oops did I say sheep. Lol
Here is the link to Fertrel. http://www.fertrell.com

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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Mike

1667 Posts
Mike
Argyle WI
United States of America

Posted - Nov 23 2014 :  5:20:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Learned to spin from my German/Russian grandpa in North Dakota in 1950 or '51. Lots of fun. Learned to spin flax first, then wool. Have several wheels here now, one was my college graduation present from mom. Norwegian made wheel, came from Mt. Horeb, Wi area. Has an 1879 date hand carved on it. And some child's crayon drawings too. Came with two bobbins, really need three or more to do your plying with. I like to ply off the first two or three spindles right on to the next three, saves a lot of work.

Hand cards take a lot of time. North of here, and now in our own town there are carding mills that came from out east. The one north of us also has a sample carder that takes about a bushel at a crack. They have a 200 spindle spinning jenny and also a large sock machine, twenty or thirty pair at once. Cool stuff.
Like my old Pratt and Whitney rifle barrel making machinery, this stuff is cast iron from an age when craftmanship was something to be proud of. Who else would pinstripe a machine. Hell, my old Landis #1 harness stitcher has pinstriping on it too. It was made in the 1890's.

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Mike

1667 Posts
Mike
Argyle WI
United States of America

Posted - Nov 23 2014 :  5:22:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Meant to say 'bobbins' rather than 'spindles' when plying.
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 23 2014 :  5:25:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They don't make em like they used too. And if you live in the USA they hardly make anything anymore. Makes me want to cry sometimes.

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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NellieBelle

11033 Posts


Posted - Nov 23 2014 :  5:43:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How wonderful to learn to spin from your grandpa and a graduation gift of a spinning wheel. That is beyond cool. Yes, things made from years back had more pride put into them. A lot of that is lacking now a days. The carpenter work done years ago compared to now is an example. Things were built with skill and built to last, not thrown together so you can get to the next job. Pitiful. Thanks for sharing all this Mike. Absolutely fascinating.
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CloversMum

3486 Posts


Posted - Nov 24 2014 :  08:14:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What a gift and legacy left to you Mike! Hopefully, you are able to pass your skills on to someone else as well...truly a gift that can keep on giving! A large part of the gift would most definitely be the history involved with the spinning wheels and where you learned how to spin.

And, Ron, I did print off your message about the feed that you use for the COWS (not sheep...yet!!). Thanks! Although the funny thing was that I was just talking to a young friend that I ran into yesterday and she wanted to know if I ever raised sheep! I told her no but I was just introduced to the Icelandic breed...she LOVES that breed and said that she would love to help me! Oh my!! What is happening?? Really, truly we do not have the set up for more animals...we so desperately need a barn and a better set up for my chickens too. But I really do have a not-so-secret-now desire to learn how to spin wool.

Loving life and family on our Idaho farm, Meadowlark Heritage Farm; A few Jersey cows; a few alpacas; a few more goats, and even more ducks and chickens
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Ron

4666 Posts
Ronnie
Peever SD
USA

Posted - Nov 24 2014 :  09:43:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Icelandics do not require much shelter. Mine actually would leave the barn to go lay in the snow!
Easy shelters can be made with a few pallets and a little plywood.

Seems like a visit to the place close to you would be a good start! I would reccomend just starting with no more than two sheep. Ideal if the would sell you a couple bred ewes!

With a moo moo here and a moo moo there, here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
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